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Associate Career Coach (Undergraduate)

THE BASICS

  • We are looking for an Associate Career Coach to work with undergraduate students currently enrolled in Business School and/or Finance Programs.
  • The Universities we work with are located in Washington D.C., -> you will be required to be on campus, working face-to-face with students, at least 3 days of the week.
  • You will be a contract coach with Careerly; this means flexible hours, you get to set your own schedule, and you will be paid monthly per number of hours of coaching. 

THE REQUIREMENTS

  • 5 years of PROFESSIONAL business related experience. What do we mean by professional experience? Actual real-world work experience in careers that are of interest to our students. This is what you will leverage and draw on to coach the students.  
  • If you are coming through HR and/or org dev channels - i.e. that is your experience- also valuable. However, it is essential that you have knowledge of specific career tracks (i.e. Marketing, Finance, etc.).
  • If you have a coaching certificate or career dev. training - great! - but again, we won't hold you to it. We certainly don't require it. 
  • But you are the kind of person who loves helping/guiding others, and coaching/counseling others is a natural talent. A high-degree of emotional intelligence and patience is required for this role.
  • Undergraduate degree, preferably in a business related program. Or currently in grad school in a business related or MBA program.
  • Very strong writing, editing, communication skills- especially reviewing and editing resumes and cover letters. Also interview prep practice and training.  

THE COMPANY

Careerly is a career coaching, strategy, and education company based in Washington D.C. We are one of the most dedicated (and fun!) career services companies around town, and have a lot of fans among the twenty-something/ thirty-something young professionals, mid-career career-switchers, and of course our large population of MBA students. 

We are also international, and serve clients globally in Europe, Asia, and the United States. We inspire people to take meaningful actions – whether that’s updating a resume or volunteering on a project to gain experience. We’re best known for our combination of left-brain analysis and right-brain intuition. Check out our
YouTube Channel with close to a half a million views on our career videos. 

THE JOB

With over 520+ clients (including many college undergraduates, especially seniors) we run a high volume service. We are looking to transform how career services is delivered at universities so that students have a much better (functional role and/or industry experience related) career service experience. Specifically you will: 

  • Offer knowledge-based and industry-specific advice relevant to each individual’s situation to help them plan and implement effective and  realistic career development plans according to their industry/career interest.
  • Review, write, craft results-oriented resumes and cover letters and ensure documents are "employer-ready."
  • Conduct mock interviews, both behavioral, case and technical, which are in line with industry practice.
  • Develop credibility with and build strong relationships with students as they go through the entire job search process, from self-reflection to offer negotiation.
  • Use your direct experience and learnt knowledge to guide students on different career tracks in finance, consulting, marketing etc.  
  • Conduct outreach to track student employment status and maintain detailed records of student appointments and employment activities.

To apply please send your cover letter and resume to hello@careerly.co

DEADLINE: 15 September 2016

 

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Associate Career Coach (Finance Specialization)

THE BASICS

  • We are looking for an Associate Career Coach to work with undergraduate and graduate students currently enrolled in Business School and/or Finance Programs.
  • The Universities we work with are located in Washington D.C., -> you will be required to be on campus, working face-to-face with students, at least 3 days of the week.
  • You will be a contract coach with Careerly; this means flexible hours, you get to set your own schedule, and you will be paid monthly per number of hours of coaching. 

THE REQUIREMENTS

  • 5 years of INDUSTRY experience. What do we mean by industry experience? Actual real-world work experience in careers that are of interest to our students. This is what you will leverage and draw on to coach the students.  
  • In this case your work experience would include a minimum of 2-3 years in finance, banking, corporate finance, corporate banking, investment management or related role. 
  • If you are coming through HR and/or org dev channels - i.e. that is your experience- also valuable, and we are interested to talk to you! However, this is not the ideal fit we are seeking.
  • If you have a coaching certificate or career dev. training - great! - but again, we won't hold you to it. We certainly don't require it. 
  • But you are the kind of person who loves helping/guiding others, and coaching/counseling others is a natural talent. You have probably been a career/leadership mentor in school and work.
  • Masters degree, preferably in a business/finance related program. Or currently in grad school in a finance or MBA program. 
  • Very strong writing, editing, communication skills- especially reviewing and editing business documents (which can be parlayed to working on resumes and cover letters). 

THE COMPANY

Careerly is a career coaching, strategy, and education company based in Washington D.C. We are one of the most dedicated (and fun!) career services companies around town, and have a lot of fans among the twenty-something/ thirty-something young professionals, mid-career career-switchers, and of course our large population of MBA students. 

We are also international, and serve clients globally in Europe, Asia, and the United States. We inspire people to take meaningful actions – whether that’s updating a resume or volunteering on a project to gain experience. We’re best known for our combination of left-brain analysis and right-brain intuition. Check out our YouTube Channel with close to a half a million views on our career videos. 

THE JOB

With over 520+ clients (including many grad school/ MBA students) we run a high volume service. We are looking to transform how career services is delivered at universities so that students have a much better (functional role and/or industry experience related) career strategy service.  Specifically, you will: 

  • Offer accurate and knowledge-based finance industry-specific advice relevant to each individual’s situation to help them plan and implement effective and  realistic career development plans,
  • Review, write, craft finance focused resumes and cover letters to ensure documents are "employer-ready."
  • Conduct mock interviews, both behavioral, case and technical, which are in line with industry practice.
  • Develop credibility with and build strong relationships with students as they go through the entire job search process, from self-reflection to offer negotiation.
  • Use your industry experience and "in-the-corridors" knowledge when you coach students to help them get a feel for different finance roles- what it's like to work in corporate finance versus investment banking. 
  • Conduct outreach to track student employment status and maintain detailed records of student appointments and employment activities.

Please send your cover letter and resume to Ms. Hira Fernando: hirafernando@careerly.co

DEADLINE: 15 August 2015

 

 

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CAREERLY MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA SUMMER INTERN **PAID**

YOU

  • Love branding and designing creative online communications that make fans out of readers.
  • Spend a lot of time finding and sharing the right content online with followers on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and LinkedIn.
  • Consider yourself an entrepreneur and a self-starter- someone that doesn’t need to be micromanaged.

THE COMPANY

Careerly is a career coaching, strategy, and education company based in Washington D.C. We are one of the most fun career services companies around town, and have a lot of fans, especially among the late-20s to early thirty-something young professionals in the city. Our #Monday Inspiration newsletter has close to 2000 subscribers.

We are also international, and serve clients globally in Europe, Asia, and the United States. We inspire people to take meaningful actions – whether that’s updating a resume or volunteering on a project to gain experience. We’re best known for our combination of left-brain analysis and right-brain intuition.

THE JOB

With over 470+ clients (including many grad school/ MBA students) we run a high volume service, we are looking to transform how career services – especially the educational component - is delivered. As a summer intern you will get to work on a variety of big real-world projects that will help us grow.  We really need your help!

Specific tasks:

  • Helping promote a vast amount of content and building our online communities by posting daily on our Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube channels.
  • Video editing (iMovies or Final Cut Pro) for short career training videos as well as promotional videos for clients. Includes shooting editing, adding notes and titles, and intros and outros.
  • YouTube Analytics and Channel Optimization: finding ways to grow the number of subscribers and fans, as well as identifying potential partnerships.
  • Answering inquiries about our services and pricing, converting these prospects into clients, and setting up coaching appointments, registration for workshops/webinars etc.

REQUIREMENTS

  • Background in Marketing, Communication, and Social Media, with strong tech skills- analytics, webinars, trouble-shooting, tech support for live online events
  • Bachelor’s degree with some relevant experience or - if you are still in school- a combination of internships and coursework that is relevant.
  • Video editing using iMovie or Final Cut Pro. Experience with YouTube channel optimization is a major plus!
  • Proficient in In-Design, Photoshop, Powerpoint, Prezi etc. to help create marketing materials or teaching materials for our workshops and webinars.
  • Inclination towards building relationships and/or experience with business development, especially developing partnerships in a startup context to leverage the Careerly brand.
  • Organized, efficient, with an ability to prioritize, and get things done with little supervision. Willing to work on a flexible schedule. We don't expect you to come into an office every day but we expect you to be highly responsive at all times.

Beyond that... personality-wise?  Our ideal candidate is someone who walks into a room of people and can’t leave without making a few friends. Someone who loves the next big idea in tech, marketing, and social media, and is creative and thoughtful.

We value our young associates and interns and go the extra mile to make sure you receive a learning experience that fits your career goals.  After all we are Careerly - we are in business precisely to help people have a good career experience!

DETAILS

This position is for 30 hours per week for 10 weeks (PAID) and begins June 1st and ends August 14th. There is a strong possibility for extension based on budget and performance.

Compensation: $1800 salary + another $1000 of individual career coaching + priceless networking opportunities with the best and brightest in recruiting circles from top companies and organizations around D.C.

To apply please send your cover letter and resume to Ms. Seema Mishra at hello@careerly.co

Deadline: April 10th 2016

 

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Three Easy Steps to Know Your Worth

We’re all told growing up not to brag, not be a showoff, not to boast. We’re told to be humble and unassuming. We don’t know how to talk about our accomplishments without feeling guilty or feeling awkward. We constantly question whether we’re talking too much about ourselves or overstepping bounds. We’re cautious about giving ourselves too much credit.

In our day-to-day lives and personal relationships this might be the best approach, but it is a different story in the workplace, and especially when applying for jobs and interviewing.

We often miss out on opportunities because we can’t talk about ourselves in a way that captures our value (and we’ve touched on it before here). Another candidate may have exactly the same experience (or less experience) as you. Yet, the way they’re able to convey their impact makes all the difference in the world. Ultimately, they’re also the one that gets hired because the employer wants the best candidate who can deliver exceptional results.

The problem is that we often struggle to identify our own accomplishments or we hesitate to take ownership of them for fear of giving ourselves undeserved praise.

So how can you address this inability to recognize and confidently discuss your accomplishments so you can be the one getting the job offer?

STEP 1: Reflect

The first step is to take a bit of time to reflect on what you did on a day-to-day basis for your employer. Perhaps every morning you were tasked with getting the team coffee. Now this is a pretty mundane responsibility and not something you want to advertise on your resume. But, take a second to think about it- why were you tasked with getting coffee for the team? Was it so they could use that time more productively? Perhaps for a daily team meeting where they discussed opportunities for revenue growth?

STEP 2: Realize (or Research)

Now, think a little deeper. What was the outcome of all those meetings?

Don’t panic if you can’t come up with an answer immediately. Not everyone can see the big picture right away. It might take a little investigating to figure this out. Maybe strike up a conversation with your supervisor about the purpose of those meetings or take a second look at those companywide emails from management that talk about the end-of-quarter results.

Regardless, asking questions and taking a moment to look at the big picture can lead you to exactly where you want to go. Maybe after quick chat with a colleague you learn that the firm realized 50% growth in revenue as a result of these daily meetings- and that’s good information for you to know!

STEP 3: Resolve

In this example, you can confidently draw the conclusion that you “helped drive 50% growth in revenue for the firm.”

As it turns out, buying coffee every morning was actually pretty important. You saved valuable time for the team which they used to find solutions and opportunities to grow the top line. This is a much more robust and impressive contribution than just getting coffee for your team and more importantly- it’s 100% true.

By simply adding on the verb “helped” you automatically attach yourself to the larger accomplishments and goals of your organization. To isolate the bigger goal, it helps to ask yourself why whenever you think about your responsibilities and assignments: why were you assigned that task, why was your team taking on that goal, etc. By continuing to ask the question “Why?” you’ll eventually lead yourself to the final end result and define your actual contribution.

The most important takeaway here is that outlining your accomplishments on your resume or talking about them in an interview isn’t bragging. It’s actually being honest about what you can contribute to an organization and how much you actually have to offer. If you continue to downplay what you’ve done, no one wins: recruiters miss out on hiring a great catch and you might miss out on great career opportunities. So, don’t be afraid to let yourself take some credit!

Lastly, a good starting place to begin crafting your resume is the Careerly Resume Template. This will get your resume in a clear and concise format. Once you have your content formatted, check out the Careerly Resume Guide for next steps on how to build up your resume content and the 200+ Resume Bullets to see real-life examples of show off your value add- and finally land that job offer!

 

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A Preview with a Purpose

Do you find yourself reading the back of a book cover? How about checking out the latest movie trailers? Taking advantage of the free samples at your grocery store?

Have you ever taken a moment to think about why you do these things (well, that last one is probably because you’re hungry)?

More than likely it’s because you want to get an idea of what something is about before you fully delve into it. Before you buy 700 page book, you want to see if it will be a page turner or if it will bore you to tears. Before you invest a few hours of your life on a movie, you want to see if it’s actually the “comedy film of the year” or if it’s just another movie with cheap laughs.

The point is that people don’t want to waste their time on something that isn’t worth the time/financial/etc. investment.

The same thing applies to when you submit your resume for a job, especially when your resume is a two-pager (or more). While your extensive and relevant professional experience requires (and deserves) a two-page resume, a recruiter has to spend hours upon hours going through cover letters and resumes. The last thing they want is to have to read through a resume that seems to go on forever. It’s especially frustrating if they read through a lengthy resume, only to find that the candidate isn’t a good match for the role.

How do you avoid creating more work for the person you want to impress while simultaneously making sure they know that you are a perfect fit for the position?

The answer is to include a summary at the top of your two-page resume.

This brief section of your resume gives you the opportunity to give employers a quick overview of who you are and what you bring to the table. You can think of it as an elevator pitch for your resume: it gives enough information to draw the reader in and leaves them wanting to learn more about you.

Crafting a summary section can be tricky. You want to say just enough to highlight your skills and competencies, without giving too much away at the outset. It can be hard to figure out what to focus on when you have years of experience and so much you want to say. The trick is to focus on three key areas: underlying skills, relevant skills, and employer focus.

Here are some real-life summary sections that succinctly and successfully convey the candidate’s skills and qualifications:

Example #1:

A professional with 20+ years of experience in financial accounting, staff management, and customer engagement. Experience in financial management has developed strong quantitative skills and excellent financial reporting skills that have been recognized for their accuracy and clarity. Has been consistently cited as an integral part of any organization due to ability to effectively manage staff and deliver outstanding customer service. A dependable and honest individual who puts the needs of organization and clients first.

Example #2:

-Environmental consultant with 12+ years of experience in economic development and environmental finance, both U.S. domestic and international assignments. Major clients including USAID and World Bank.
-Excellent project management skills managing an international portfolio of projects and government contracts worth over $3 million year on year, including large teams of 150+ subject matter experts. 
-English and Spanish bilingual. Country experience: Barbados, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mali, United States.

Careerly’s Resume Guide discusses each of the three previously mentioned areas in-depth and includes more stellar real-life examples. Use these tips and notes to get your summary noticed and make the recruiter- not just willing- but excited to flip to the next page of your resume!

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Keeping Up Appearances

“It’s all about presentation.” I’m sure you’ve heard that before. You may have heard it in reference to how a chef carefully and artistically places food on the plate. Or maybe it was on a makeover show where some clueless person is ambushed and given a brand new polished look. The takeaway is that appearances matter and even more so when you’re trying to make a great first impression. Now, how does this apply to finding a job or landing an interview?

Well, you make your first impression on employers when you submit your resume. Commonly (and unfortunately) your resume isn’t the only one up for consideration. It can be literally one in hundreds- if not thousands- of resumes. At this point the recruiter must sift through all of these resumes to get this pile down to a manageable number. The quickest and easiest way to do this is to do a quick 30 second review based on- you guessed it- appearance.

Now, you might be saying, “That’s not fair! They should look beyond just looks and pay attention to what’s actually on there!” The reality is that most employers don’t have the capacity to give each and every candidate a fighting chance. So how do you make sure you get your application into the ring?

The first step is to focus on the format of your resume.

There are a ton of ways to format your resume. Some are wildly creative and unforgettable, but our advice is to stick with traditional templates for most business careers, and consider unorthodox options for creative careers - e.g. graphic design, web development, and social media.

Regardless of the format of your resume, it should be clean, consistent, and punchy. Make sure your resume format follows these rules and you’ll be one step closer to making sure your application gets the attention it deserves.  

Luckily, the Careerly Resume Guide offers specific guidelines on formatting, in particular on visuals, resume length, structure, font, and much, much more (like what to actually write once you’ve made it look good!). We’ve also taken the guesswork out of the equation by creating the Careerly Resume Templates. Just plug in your content and you’re good to go!

We're all guilty of judging a book by its cover, but with your smarts and our guidance we can get you on the fast track to make it to the next round!

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10 Strategies to Realize Your Entrepreneurial Dreams

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10 Strategies to Realize Your Entrepreneurial Dreams

 

1. Follow your passion.. but don't forget you have to eat too. Listen to the inspiration (Do What You Love and those TedTalks) but be realistic and aim for longterm sustainability. Careerly's three components to work you love

2. Know yourself. What are your specific learnt skill-sets? Differentiate natural talents from learnt skills. Play to your natural talents and strengths, and create work where you are 'in flow', as opposed to struggling to swim upstream against your competitors. 

3. Young college entrepreneurs: remember It's a long game, and you are at the very start. On the first rung of the ladder. This is a time to experiment, do your research, talk to people (mentors, industry leaders). Try new ideas and types of activities and discover what you are actually good at. 

4. Understand how to talk about your IMPACT on resumes and personal bios. Not descriptions of jobs you've had but what did you accomplish? What value did you add? 

5. Quantify your IMPACT - Show, don't' tell - on resumes,. CLs, and LinkedIn profiles. TWO HUNDRED+ examples of this can be found here. 

6.  Create robust LinkedIn (and other social media) profiles. Make sure your profiles are professional, consistent, and keyword SEO driven. For LinkedIn, a powerful summary is critical. 

7. Build presence on and use blogs and networking sites like LInkedIn to looks for opportunities - start-up, entrepreneurial, internships, and project works. 

8. Network now! Start building your community of partners, mentors, future investors NOW. It takes time to build strong authentic relationships,which is the base of any good network. Learn how to give to your network, share resources etc. 

9. Do informational interviews for getting in front of key people. Understand what an informational is - YOU drive the process. Be prepared. Have good questions. Be very careful and intentional in how you write networking emails

10. Learn how to Tell Your Story. Nail your Elevator Pitch. (So.. "Tell Me About Yourself"). Learn how to present yourself as someone who consistently adds value (has IMPACT) wherever you go, whatever you do.  See #4 and #5 above. 

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How to Write Those Networking Emails

You know the statistic: 80% of jobs today are landed through networking - i.e. through your network of friends, family, colleagues, and professional and personal contacts. Only 20% of jobs are found 'cold' through simply applying for them on job boards and company websites.

In this document we are not going to cover how to build, use, and give back to your network. This is covered in depth elsewhere, in particular this workshop. Here, we focus on how to communicate with your network, and ask for what you want in a professional, authentic, and -ultimately - effective way. 

Keep your networking emails short, succinct, and easy for the reader to understand.  Make sure the "ask" (what you are asking your contact for) is clear, and keep it to ONE single "ask" per communication- make it easy for them to say yes to your request.

In our Careerly training document, Networking Email Examples, we give you SEVEN TEMPLATES  of common networking emails we help our clients write time and time again. We have included thank you notes post interviews and informational interviews, as well as that unforgettable follow-up email after you've met with someone important and want to leave a killer impression.

Download the training document here.

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Cover Letter Tutorial + Our Very Best Samples

Introduction

If you think you can ditch the cover letter, it's probably because you haven't seen a really good cover letter do its magic.  In any event, we don't think you should skip this step, and in some cases it will be a requirement. In this document, we have put together five stunningly effective cover letter examples based on our clients' and students' fabulous work. 

The cover letter is your BEST chance to match yourself to the job. It's the best opportunity, early on in the game (you'll have another chance at interview stage), to target your unique content to the position you are applying for. Unlike a resume, which is more a testament to what you can do (a historical record of accomplishments) the cover letter is forward looking and highlights and ties together the key themes from your resume for the prospective employer. A resume - if done well, if you've really optimized and nailed down those bullets following the P-A-R formula + quantification - isn't always easy to adapt or tweak each time you apply to a new position. That is the job of the cover letter. This is where you match, as precisely as possible, what the job description is asking for with the skills and work experience you bring to the table.   

Basic structure

In the basic structure that we most often use, the cover letter has THREE distinct parts: i) an introductory para; ii) the body, which is the meat of the letter and where the above-mentioned magical matching happens; and iii) a short concluding para and call to action.

Let's tackle each of these:

Introduction

  • One main para or two short paras, but keep it to no more than 10 lines in total.
  • Introduce yourself, and give the top-line- name, school, years of experience in XY industry and/or functional area.
  • Mention interest in company/team. Be specific- pick a feature unique to them. 
  • End this section but stating that you'll be a great fit for position, and will bring your unique combo of skills+experience to make a contribution in this role. Specifically.. and this leads to the main section..

Body

  • The Body starts with some version of "Specifically I would like to highlight the following skills and experiences:"
  • Pick 3 - at most 4- skills/competencies/experiences to highlight, GIVEN what you think they want to see. 
  • For each, give one or two examples. Focus on a clear and specific result where possible. Quantify/ add numbers. 
  • Keep these three bullet mini-paras to a maximum of 6 lines.
  • You may opt for a longer list of bullets (5 to 7 points) where each is 2 to 3 lines of text. You'll see this approach in Sample Letter 2.  But avoid a long list of vague or general bullet points that don't say anything concrete or have no results/numbers at all - again it's a letter not a laundry list.

Conclusion

  • You may add one more thought - e.g.:
  • Wrap up by re-iterating your interest, thank them, and indicate a next step -e.g. looking forward to interviewing.


Why we use this structure / method 

This structure is the clearest way to get your key points across to the recruiter. It's an optimal way to make the you-job match in a clear and most powerful way.  You are literally giving it to them on a platter. Any other format will make the clean ruthlessness delivery of this primary objective harder.

Are there other interesting, creative ways of writing cover letters? Yes. Check out our Sample Letter 5. You could write a story. You could write a chronological narrative, where each para builds on the one before. But free flow full para CLs are difficult to pull off  unless you are a prolific writer, and even then there is always the risk the key competencies part gets lost in the picture.

Remember that no matter what you do - whatever maybe the icing on the cake- the cake itself is always, without exception, the way you make a match between your skills and their requirements.   

Other Key Tips

  •  Cover letters should be ONE page unless you are a 20+ year senior level hire, or applying for a research/academic position.

  • Use a header with your information - its nice and clean.
  • Include date, company name + address in the top left corner
  • Name of recruiter or hiring manager if you know it
  • You may reference the position either just above the "Dear..  start of the letter Or in the opening para. Don't do both.
  • If your letter is on the short side -center the content- position the letter be in the middle of the page, don't leave black space at the bottom.  If you have full one-page content- great! - just ensure that margins on all sides are no less than 0.6 inches.
  • In the middle section. you may use bullets OR bold the headings. Don't do both, as that looks like overkill.  While bullets and bold text helps structure key points for the reader it should still have the overall feel of a letter. Avoid underlining, sub-heads, sections, or any other formatting beyond the middle para call-outs. 

Best practice + samples

This is a good example of a (real-life) client cover letter, and we will use it as a quick tutorial to take you through the main points.  In this document we present you with four more recent samples of cover letters we think are powerful. All four of these clients got the interview- and eventually the job - that these cover letters were for.  

Download both documents here.

 

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This is How you Nail those Resume Bullets

The top 1% of resumes - e.g. the ones used in competitive industries such as investment banking and strategy consulting -  focus on content over form; and on accomplishments over job descriptions. Typically, every single sentence or bullet point is presented in a P-A-R framework  (problem, action, result), with an emphasis on that R – RESULTS. Content is supported with data, examples, and numbers.

There is no reason why this approach can't be applied to every single industry vertical or job function, regardless of whether it is corporate, non-profit, or public sector. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND QUANTIFIED RESULTS

It's always about impact. Whether you are a banker or a line cook, it should still always be about impact. What have you got done for people (past employers and clients) - did you do something faster? Better? Did you help cut costs, increase revenues, raise funds, built relationships, manage staff? 

Let's develop that line of inquiry a little more: 

Project Management – Completed all project milestones 30 days ahead of schedule saving the organization 20% in expenditures.

Digital Media – Ran a tight multi-platform social media campaign resulting in a 35% increase in page visits, a 10% increase in average time on site, and a 3% increase in clickthrough rate.

Marketing – Developed a sales and marketing strategy for a brand with the goal of increasing global revenue from $29M to $50M within two years.

Non-profit - Wrote XX grant proposals, and helped raise $120,000 on average per fiscal year over last 5 years; organizations included  the Ford Foundation and the Gates Foundation.

Customer Service – Resolved 92% of customer complaints on the first call resulting in a 11% increase in Consumer Satisfaction Index (CSI) scores.

Operations – Streamlined processes resulting in a 25% increase in inventory turns.

Finance/Accounting – Successfully implemented restructuring initiatives leading to a 10% decrease in COGS from $683M to $613M, and a 10% increase in operating margin.

HR – Implemented new policies resulting in a 10% decrease in employee turnover.

TWO HUNDRED MORE EXAMPLES... BY INDUSTRY

We stand by it. The methodology above - focusing on a result, quantifying that result where possible - can be applied to every single industry, every functional role, every job. It applies to corporate as well as non-profit; to junior as well as senior. To unpaid work, to internships, to freelance gigs. It applies to start-ups, yoga instructors, and small business owners. 

Since we have now racked up countless hours  slaving over countless resumes, and we have had the opportunity to work across many many sectors, industries, types of jobs, and job functions, we are building a database of hundreds of real-life examples pulled from Careerly resumes.  

200+ RESUME BULLET EXAMPLES

“BUT I HAVEN’T DONE THAT!”

OK, so now you ARE convinced that it can be done. But you are thinking "but I haven't done that!" As in "me personally.. I haven't done things like that"

 Trust me, you have! Everyone has. They just don’t know it. Either you have never thought of your work like this. Or you don’t know where to get the numbers and how to quantify. We can help you with that. 

Sometimes people struggle to see their own impact, or have not really thought about their work history in those terms. But if you took a minute to think about it, you'd be amazed. You have accomplished many definable things for your past employers, clients, and others. You have probably done many good things in your community or for teams you have been part of . 

In any event, you have to start thinking like this,  A focus on value and impact is what will make your resume not just a good one (because let's face it, nowadays everyone has a good resume, especially if they’ve used the services of a professional resume writer) but the one that cinches the interview… and ultimately the job.

WHY IT'S ALL ABOUT IMPACT AND VALUE

Careerly uses an impact + value + numbers focused methodology based on thousands of hours of working on some of the world’s most competitive resumes and client profiles for top investment banking, private equity, strategy consulting, and marketing positions. Subsequently we developed the expertise to apply this results-based method to an extremely diverse range of positions in both the corporate and non-profit world.

You may feel like the impact + value+ numbers process we describe here appears to go well beyond resumes and cover letters. You are right. This isn’t just about the resume or what’s on one piece of paper. It’s about getting a handle on all your major accomplishments throughout your career and life and, thus, nailing down the best possible content from a marketing and positioning perspective.

Once you quantify the results you have achieved for your employers, as well as the overall skills development trajectory over the full length of your career, you’ll be amazed at the value you bring to the table. You will feel good. Your confidence will ride high. And you now have killer content to use on resumes, cover letters, and LinkedIn profiles, as well as to rock your interviews.

Remember the point of your resume is not to get the job, it's to get the interview. It's to get you in front of a recruiter or hiring manager. It's also to have folks feel like it is worth their time when you request an informational chat or a coffee date.  

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4 Powerful Ways to Write a Killer LinkedIn Summary

It is absolutely essential to maintain a strong presence on LinkedIn regardless of employment status. If you are actively recruiting, then it's a must. Potential recruiters, interviewers, people you are trying to network with WILL look you up. 

Your LinkedIn Summary is the most important section in your entire LinkedIn Profile. How you write this section - the style and the content you choose to include - will set the tone for every other aspect of your profile.

There are several ways to write a powerful Summary.  Here, we present you with four options that we have tried and tested many times with our clients. You don’t want to outright copy these, but at least they will give you a solid idea of some different ways to get started.  

Approach 1: Personal Story / Bio

Here, the Summary becomes a short story of you - you are subtly but powerfully conveying that what you do is also who you are. It's interesting, authentic, and is about building trust and respect. This approach is effective for experienced, mid-career folks, who have a solid 12+ years work history behind them to stand on. The one liners work well only if you already have some level of expertise/respect in your field. You can't get away with this if you are 28 years old. This rather personalized approach should include a CTA (call-to-action) at the end.

Approach 1

Approach 2: Skills & Accomplishments

This approach is excellent for people who need to highlight key skills OR have strong accomplishments and can highlight a compelling track record of results. If you are in your 20s - focus on skills; if you are in your 30s (+ upwards) - focus on accomplishments. This approach is about showing the impact you have had and the value you consistently bring to your employers, clients, and connections. It's about establishing credibility.

Approach 2

Our next one - you'll love it! - is adapted from an online dating profile. It's entertaining to read, and 100% effective. Check it out, plus one more by downloading LinkedIn Summary Approaches - all four recommended approaches, complete with examples, in one handy little document. 

Approach 3: Functional Competencies

Approach 4: "Have fun with it" Creative

 

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The Best Career Tests and Tools Explained

You would have seen some variation of this chart already. You know the drill- the most common reason for job dissatisfaction is not compensation. Or job security. Or lack of promotions and career progression. It’s not even the bad boss or crazy co-corkers (though that would be in second place!). In first place is a mismatch between skills/talent and the actual work, leading to lack of motivation, boredom, and anxiety. 

So the first order of business is, figure out what your natural talents and strengths are. Remember that these are different from learnt skills through formal education and work experience, though these play a part in honing your natural abilities. Over the years you may have learnt to be a decent presenter but are you a true blue “I love being on stage!” public speaker? I can bitterly make my way through a financial model because of my formal training but that is the furthest thing from a natural skill. Meanwhile my client Natalie who cannot string two words together but is an excel magic worker is stuck in a PR role where she simply cannot thrive. 

There are MANY tools and tests currently available - some free, some at a small cost - to assist you in this area. If you are unsure about your natural talents and strengths and how these translate to real-world careers, then this list is a good place to start. But be prepared to waste your entire day categorizing yourself! 

 

1. The Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

MBTI is one of the most common career and personality assessments in the world. There is a whole industry devoted to MBTI testing. If you don’t know your 4-letter type, there are many online quizzes to choose from - this is our favorite. You’ll get to understand i) how the needs and preferences of personality shape work preferences in general, and ii) the specific strengths and preferences of your personality type. 

2. The Keirsey Temperament Sorter®-II 

The Keirsey Temperament Sorter is part of the MBTI, in that the 16 MBTI types fall into 4 temperament categories. Check out in particular the Career Temperament Report, which is designed to help job seekers, those undertaking a career change, and students planning for future careers.  Again the idea is to match your natural temperament to the right kind of work. 

3. Strengths Finder

Strengths Finder 2.0 - also called Strengths Quest - is best purchased as a book, with the access code inside. That way you get the full language of the 34 themes, as well as a detailed breakdown of your top five themes. The philosophy behind SF (very much in line with what we teach at Careerly) is to focus on and built on your natural strengths as opposed to fixing your 'weaknesses'.  SF the book also gives you hundreds of strategies for applying your strengths in daily life... at work, in the community etc. 

4. The Motivated Appraisal of Personal Potential (MAPP) 

MAPP is also rooted in personality psychology and motivation, but structured differently. It asks 71 questions; each consists of three statements, and you are asked to select one statement with which you most agree and the one with which you least agree. The report identifies interest in job content, temperament, aptitude, your approach to people, things, and data, and your reasoning, mathematical, and language capacity. The test identifies your top 10 career paths. 

5. O*NET Online Career Exploration tools

O*NET is very popular with University/College career services, and assists students in finding occupations and conducting skills assessments. The Skills Search function is especially helpful. 

6. The Holland Code Model 

The Holland Code Model matches jobs into job codes, interest clusters, work personality environments, or personality types. The Occupational Codes are Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Conventional.


Please note that these assessments are neither particularly scientific nor comprehensive; on their own each may provide a part of the puzzle. But doing as many of them as possible, together with other clarification approaches (e.g. working with a coach), should  get you close to a full picture. 

 

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